World 28, Exploration B

Hands holding a sieve with crushed daffodil heads and ivy leaves over yellow liquid in a white bowl set a white cloth, with ivy leaves and daffodils around.

Synthetic dye shortages in World 28 during WWII prompted growth of dye plants in the ‘dig for victory’ movement and natural dyeing skills were taught in ‘make do and mend’ pamphlets. As the war ended this appetite for self-sufficiency continued and became an integral part of British culture.

Ivy soap is a popular way to brighten up naturally dyed clothes in World 28:

A great way to care for your clothes, Ivy Soap is amazing for brightening up your naturally dyed clothes all while cleaning them as well! Meaning your sustainable wardrobe can last longer than ever before!  

You can make the ivy soap with ingredients found either in your garden or leftovers from the kitchen, such as onion skins. The best part is you can compost the waste soap without hurting your soil.  

The recipes, as usual, are going to be shared on The Growing Times newspaper, delivered at your door by the milkperson in the morning your reusables are collected/delivered to you, along with the groceries.  

You can also visit the Ivy Soap webpage for more tips, seasonal recipes and to get in touch if you have any questions.  

If you are part of the care workers or other groups with limited time or resources to make it yourself, join the mailing list and a provision of already made soap will be delivered at your door.  

Looking forward to seeing you in the next harvest market.  

This Exploration was contributed by Victoria Frausin and Rachel Ward (located in the UK), developed from a World contributed by Beth Pagett, using a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International licence which allows others to share and adapt the work in any medium and for any purpose, providing that they credit the authors and share their material using the same Creative Commons licence.

Does this World remind you of something?

I am keen to hear about any historical or contemporary real-world examples – whether individual practices, subcultures or mainstream activities – that this fiction brings to mind.

Please share any such examples using this form. Thank you!

Published by Amy Twigger Holroyd

explorer of Fashion Fictions

%d bloggers like this: